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Art & Photography

A is a Critic: Writings from the Spectator

£6.00

As art critic of The Spectator, Andrew Lambirth’s reviews and articles have been entertaining and informing readers of the magazine since 1996. As he himself has written : “The coverage that this magazine, a weekly, gives to the arts is far wider than many daily newspapers. I wish more arts editors would take the initiative to cover a greater range of exhibitions than just the obvious.”

Adam Fuss

£8.00

With Jacques-Louis Daguerre, William Talbot Fox, Etienne Jules-Marey and William Blake as his predecessors, Adam Fuss creates photograms and daguerreotypes that evoke a general poetic and spiritual vision akin to urbanites of the 1800s, people who have lost contact with nature and God. While technically seeking to refine the beginnings of photography, Fuss attempts, in the 100 new works presented here, to record life and death. Colorful spirals created by pendulums lead into great depths; snakes create geometric waves in water; loving pairs of rabbits appear in silhouette; a hunched woman cries; sunflowers sprout withered leaves and broken stems; otherwise placid water bears the concentric marks of water drops; the shadows of silvery children’s clothing hover in mid-air; light reflects on birds in flight–and all, for Fuss, mark the simultaneous presence and absence of the corporeal under the title My Ghost.

Churchhill: The Statesman as Artist

£19.99

Across almost 50 years, Winston Churchill produced more than 500 paintings. His subjects included his family homes at Blenheim and Chartwell, evocative coastal scenes on the French Riviera, and many sun-drenched depictions of Marrakesh in Morocco, as well as still life pictures and an extraordinarily revealing self-portrait, painted during a particularly troubled time in his life. In war and peace, Churchill came to enjoy painting as his primary means of relaxation from the strain of public affairs.

 

In his introduction to Churchill: The Statesman as Artist, David Cannadine provides the most important account yet of Churchill’s life in art, which was not just a private hobby, but also, from 1945 onwards, an essential element of his public fame. The first part of this book brings together for the first time all of Churchill’s writings and speeches on art, not only ‘Painting as a Pastime’, but his addresses to the Royal Academy, his reviews of two of the Academy’s summer exhibitions, and an important speech he delivered about art and freedom in 1937.

 

The second part of the book provides previously uncollected critical accounts of his work by some of Churchill’s contemporaries: Augustus John’s hitherto unpublished introduction to the Royal Academy exhibition of Churchill’s paintings in 1959, and essays and reviews by Churchill’s acquaintances Sir John Rothenstein, Professor Thomas Bodkin and the art critic Eric Newton. The book is lavishly illustrated with reproductions of many of Churchill’s paintings, some of them appearing for the first time. Here is Churchill the artist more fully revealed than ever before.

Cuba: Music and Revolution

£35.00

The first ever book about Cuban record sleeve design, compiled by Gilles Peterson and Stuart Baker, Cuba: Music and Revolution , when Cuba’s Special Period, brought about by the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the withdrawal of Russia’s financial support for the Cuban government, led to the demise of vinyl-record manufacturing in Cuba. The artwork here reflects both the cultural and musical depth of Cuba as well as the political influence of revolutionary communism.

 

Over the past century, Cuban music has produced a seemingly endless variety of styles―rumba, mambo, son, salsa―at a dizzyingly fast rate. Since the 1940s a steady stream of Cuban musicians has also made the migration to the US, sparking changes in North American musical forms: bandleader Machito set New York’s jazz and Latin scene on fire, and master drummer Chano Pozo’s entry into Dizzy Gillespie’s group led to the birth of Latin jazz, to name just two.

 

After the Cuban Revolution in 1959, the new government closed American-owned nightclubs and consolidated the island’s recording industry under a state-run monopoly. Out of this new socialist agenda came new musical styles, including the Nueva Trova movement of left-wing songwriters. The 1980s saw more experimentation in modernist jazz, salsa and Afro-Cuban folkloric music.

 

Generously illustrated with hundreds of colour images, Cuba: Music and Revolution presents the history of Cuban record cover art, including many examples previously unseen outside the island itself.

Factory Records: The Complete Graphic Album

£25.00

The definitive overview of the artwork of seminal Manchester-based Factory label, covering its iconic record sleeves, posters, ephemera, venues and packaging.

 

Between 1978 and 1992, Factory was one of the most important record labels in Britain. It launched the careers of Joy Division, New Order and the Happy Mondays, to name but a few; it opened the legendary Haçienda club and Dry bar; and it introduced to music the concept of high-quality, cutting-edge design. The visual languages developed alongside the music, by designers such as Peter Saville, Central Station Design and 8vo, are still widely recognized and imitated today.

Graffiti Planet

£7.99
By

A celebration of the creativity of graffiti artists from all over the world. Ever controversial, graffiti or street art has become a significant art form and continues to evolve and transform urban landscapes in cities around the globe. Compiled by an insider on the New York graffiti scene, KET, this is a collection of the work of some of the world’s top graffiti artists. Showcases work from artists such as Banksy (London), Can2 (Munich), T-Kid (New York), Os Gemeos (Sao Paolo) and many more. Graffiti Planet is a perfect companion to this dynamic and vibrant art form.

LISTEN

£7.99

An anthology of writing and art works that simply respond to the work “listen” – through poems, paintings, photos, stories, songs, gardens and much more – all about listening and the importance of silence.

 

The artwork and writing in this anthology explore different perspectives on what it means to listen: from listening to music and the environment with one ear to listening to people with the other.

Morocco

£9.00

These publications are compiled similarly to a traveler’s scrapbook and they are essential reminders to all who have been traveling or only encourage the desire to travel may it be either the historical, architectural and religious aspects, or travel to discover the world. The photographs and illustrations convey the reality of everyday life without any pretension but have been put together as a travelogue which each and everyone one of us could have compiled. Local authenticity, the visitor’s point of view, colors and more colors, curious tourists, experienced travelers. And above all passionately original photographers, creators of ambience, visual artists!

Morrissey: Alone and Palely Loitering

£20.00

Taken by renowned photographer Kevin Cummins and featuring hundreds of previously unseen images, Alone and Palely Loitering chronicles Morrissey’s world as he emerged from The Smiths and established himself as a solo artist.

 

Breathtaking photographs cover chaotic live performances, intimate portrait sessions and snatched moments backstage and on tour over a ten-year period. Cummins provides insightful commentary on the art of photography and what it was like to work and travel with Morrissey.

 

The book also includes portraits of from fans around the world with Morrissey-inspired tattoos, featuring an essay by literary academic Dr Gail Crowther exploring how this art form is used to display devotion to a unique musician.

Newspeak: British Art Now

£14.50

Over a decade after Sensation and the advent of the YBAs, a new generation of artists has arrived, whose work collectively reveals an arresting insight into the future of contemporary art in Britain. In Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty- Four, Newspeak is the only language in the world whose vocabulary gets smaller every year. This book turns that Orwellian vision on its head, showing that the range of visual languages being exploited and invented by these artists is in fact expanding and multiplying. Through sculpture, painting, photography and installation, they explore such issues as class, consumerism and the phenomenon of instant success culture, often with a distinctly British dry wit.

Picturing Prince: An Intimate Portrait

£20.00

PICTURING PRINCE sees the late icon’s former art director, STEVE PARKE, revealing stunning intimate photographs of the singer from his time working at Paisley Park. At least half of the images in the book are exclusively published here for the first time; most other images in the book are rare to the public eye.

 

Alongside these remarkable images are fifty engaging, poignant and often funny written vignettes by Parke, which reveal the very human man behind the reclusive superstar: from shooting hoops to renting out movie theatres at 4am; from midnight requests for camels to meaningful conversations that shed light on Prince as a man and artist.

 

STEVE PARKE started working with Prince in 1988, after a mutual friend showed Prince some of Steve’s photorealistic paintings. He designed everything from album covers and merchandise to sets for Prince’s tours and videos. Somewhere in all of this, he became Paisley Park’s official art director. He began photographing Prince at the request of the star himself, and continued to do so for the next several years. The images in this book are the arresting result of this collaboration.

Print + Production Finishes for CD + DVD Packaging

£6.50

Print and Production Finishes for CD and DVD Packaging delves into the physical packaging for CDs and DVDs, exploring formats, bindings, casings, materials, textures and finishes. From movie to music packaging, the book explores the creative inspiration behind the package, including artwork, typography, materials, printing techniques and formats. It also goes into detail about practical considerations and restrictions, such as record company stipulations and the inclusion of essential materials and budgets.

Print and Production Finishes for Packaging

£9.50

With informative text and specially commissioned full-colour photos, Print and Production Finishes for Packaging shows, at a glance, the different effects that can be created, and the key print and production techniques used to achieve them. Work across all budgets and production/print runs is featured, revealing the skills and techniques that grab the target audience’s attention and sell. For print and production finishing ideas on everything from boxes, cartons, bottles, tubes, cans, packs, tubs, jars, multi-packs, clamshells, blister packs, CDs or DVDs, gift packs, and a variety of other more unusual or innovative formats, Print and Production Finishes for Packaging is an indispensable ideas sourcebook and practical guide to finishes, surface graphics, detailing, and materials that help make packaging stand out from the crowd including foil blocking, pigment blocking, thermography, varnishing, laminating, embossing, debossing, die-cutting and laser-cutting; specialist inks, including metallics and fluorescents; different papers stocks and other materials; lenticular printing, and so on. By analysing the best in the business, this book gives readers a thorough understanding of materials, and of the print and production finishes that can be applied to any job.

Protest!

£48.00

The definitive overview of the life and work of acclaimed artist and filmmaker Derek Jarman (1942–1994).

 

Derek Jarman was a very English rebel, a maverick and radical artist whose unique and distinctive voice was honed protesting against the strictures of life in post-war Britain. In an innovative practice that roamed freely across all varieties of media, Jarman refused to live and die quietly. He defined bohemian London life in the 1960s, exploded into queer punk in the 70s and with unbounded creative rage, ingenuity and sheer personal charm, he triumphed over an atmosphere of fear and ignorance in the age of AIDS to produce timeless, eloquent works of art which resonate still more strongly today.

Reservoir: Sketchbooks and Selected Works

£9.00

Reservoir showcases Alice Mahers never-before-seen collection of sketchbooks and notebooks that span her entire career. These colourful, playful and evocative documents are placed alongside some of Mahers pivotal artworks, inviting the reader to examine how the artist drew from her reservoir of sketches, musings and ideas to form the cornerstones of her renowned artistic career, and to examine the complex relationship between inspiration and nished pieces. Beautifully crafted and designed with a full and innovative engagement with the material, Reservoir draws from Alice Mahers famed body of work to become a work of art in itself.

Robert Barry: An Artist Book

£9.90

Robert Barry was one of the four participants in the historic first exhibition of concept art “January 5-31”, organised by Seth Siegelaub in New York City in 1969. Since then Robert Barry has been primarily known as one of the most important representatives of this art direction/

 

The present book demonstrates the development and diversity of his work which supersedes any narrow definition of concept art. Since 1963 he has made paintings, books, projections, soundpieces, spacial installations, large wallpieces and window-pieces. Many of these works are reproduced in this book for the first time. In all of them one recognises a consequence and individuality which shows Barry to be one of the most important artists of his generation in America.

 

Text in English and German.

Saxophone Colossus: A Portrait of Sonny Rollins

£9.50

Jazz legend Sonny Rollins will celebrate his 80th birthday this fall, and Saxophone Colossus will be published to mark this occasion and honor his incredibly prolific career. This intimate appreciation combines the images of John Abbott, who as Rollins’s photographer of choice for the past 20 years has captured the saxophonist at home and at work, and the essays of Bob Blumenthal, a jazz critic who has chronicled Rollins and his art for nearly four decades. Sonny Rollins has been at the center of jazz and its evolution virtually from his birth. Growing up in Harlem in the heyday of swing and coming of age as the first wave of modernists announced their discoveries, he quickly found himself sharing bandstands with his idols and making music of his own that continues to influence and inspire. Saxophone Colossus, named for the 1956 masterpiece of the same title, is Abbott and Blumenthal’s tribute to Rollins’s music and spirit.

Side by Side

£7.50

In this innovative book of poetry from the editor of “Heart to Heart”, forty poems from around the world speak about specific works of art. Included on every spread is the poem in its original language, an English translation and the piece of art that the poem is about. Readers will look at art and poetry in a new way in this multi-cultural selection! It includes a biography (brief) of each author, translator and artist.

Smile Please!

£5.00

This is a fascinating and nostalgic collection of pictures taken by a Brighton seaside photographer from the late 1940s to the present day. They capture the spirit of the daytripper eras of the 1950s and 1960s; show the stars of the stage and screen who appeared at the Palace Pier Theatre, the Hippodrome and the Theatre Royal, as well as musicians, pop stars, tv personalities and politicians. there are photos recalling colourful, annual special events, such as the London to Brighton Veteran Run and others illustrating the changing face of the city.

Spirit of Place

£12.99

When we look at the landscape, what do we see? Do we experience the view over a valley or dappled sunlight on a path in the same way as those who were there before us? We have altered the countryside in innumerable ways over the last thousand years, and never more so than in the last hundred. How are these changes reflected in – and affected by – art and literature?

 

Spirit of Place offers a panoramic view of the British landscape as seen through the eyes of writers and artists from Bede and the Gawain-poet to Gainsborough, Austen, W. G. Sebald and Barbara Hepworth. Shaped by these distinctive voices and evocative imagery, Susan Owens describes how the British landscape has been framed, reimagined and reshaped by each generation. Each account or work of art, whether illuminated in a manuscript, jotted down in a journal or constructed from sticks and stones, holds up a mirror to its maker and their world.

 

With 80 illustrations

Street Art

£7.99
By

From Banksy to Blek le Rat, JR to Futura, the street art phenomenon is sweeping the globe. With people turning up in their thousands to view the first street art exhibition at the Tate Modern in 2008, and with celebrity endorsements from the likes of Brad Pitt to Damon Albarn, street art has captured the imaginations of art-lovers everywhere. In this exciting and fresh follow-up to the highly successful Graffiti Planet and Graffiti Planet 2, expert KET brings together another 100 awe-inspiring and extraordinary examples of urban art from around the world. Street Art is a great introduction and the perfect companion for anyone excited by this imaginative and highly prevalent art form.

The Artistic Ape

£16.90

Desmond Morris, bestselling author and internationally renowned anthropologist, offers a unique appeciation of art – from the most ancient artefact to contemporary event art. Featuring more than 350 illustrations of international art, plus 12 video clips, he combines his deep understanding of human behaviour and his love of art to create a narrative of the evolution of artistic endeavour over three million years.

The Farmer’s Year

£12.00

In the early 1930s Clare Leighton began work on a sequence of wood engravings depicting traditional farming in England over the course of a calendar year. The country was in the grips of the Great Depression. Unemployment had doubled. Hunger marches were beginning to spread through towns and cities. Machines were replacing men and women on the land.

 

Clare Leighton (1898-1989) was born in London and studied at Brighton, Slade and Central schools of art. Travel in Europe nurtured an empathy for rural workers and their culture, reflected in much of her work. An accomplished writer, Clare Leighton was encouraged to write a series of sketches to accompany the twelve engravings she produced. The Farmer’s Year was the result, published in 1933 to great acclaim in Britain and North America, running to three impressions by February 1934.

The Mirror of Venus

£9.00

Though images of women were ubiquitous in the Roman world, these were seldom intended to be taken simply at face value. The importance of marriage, motherhood and political stability was often conveyed to the Roman people through carefully constructed representations of the women of the ruling house. Mythological representations were used to present moral and political lessons to the women of Rome. Roman society was, on most levels, male dominated and women’s roles were sometimes subordinate to political and cultural needs and imperatives. Images of mortal women – empresses and other female members of the imperial family, elite women from around the empire and working women from Rome, Ostia, Pompeii and elsewhere – are analysed alongside images of goddesses and personifications and of complex mythological figures such as Amazons. This is the first general book to present a coherent, broad analysis of the numerous images of women in Roman art and to interpret their meaning and significance, all set against the broader geographical, chronological, political, religious and cultural context of the world of the Roman republic and empire and of Late Antiquity.

The Museum of Mysteries

£8.50

Who was the model for Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring? How were the Nazca Lines- the giant drawings scrawled across Peru’s desert coast- created? Why is Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus an ingenious example of mathematic computation? Travelling across centuries and continents, this collection of forty enigmatic artworks and artists examines secrets that have confounded experts and amateurs alike. Presented in beautiful colour spreads, each work or artist is profiled in an absorbing and accessible commentary that draws on the latest research. While some of these mysteries have been solved, many others continue to stump even the most learned scholars. Find out what they know – and what they don’t – in this compelling collection that will deepen readers’ appreciation of some of the world’s most recognisable masterpieces.

The Music Library

£35.00

Library Music, also known as source or mood music, was made for use in film, TV, advertising and radio. It is music given to TV stations and producers, but never commercially for sale. Similarly the sleeves are designed to represent the music not for commercial sales. These are LPs for purpose and function, not for pop charts, and as a result they look and sound like nothing else.

 

The first edition of The Music Library came out in 2005. It brought together over 325 sleeves with information about these rare and elusive albums. This highly sought after book influenced both graphic artists and music collectors around the world, quickly becoming known as the music library ‘bible’. The Music Library sparked a resurgence of interest in the subject over the last ten years, with many new libraries and recordings coming to light. As a result this revised and expanded edition contains twice the content, featuring 625 rare sleeves from 230 music library companies of the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s. The amazing cover designs of over 100 newly discovered libraries are beautifully reproduced (alongside all the sleeves contained in the first book) accompanied by exhaustive updated captions.

TO:KY:OO

£35.00

Liam Wong’s debut monograph, a cyberpunk-inspired exploration of nocturnal Tokyo.

 

‘I want to take real moments and transform them into something surreal, to make the viewer question the reality depicted in each photograph. This body of work encompasses my three years as a photographer and ultimately the completion of my debut photo series’ Liam Wong

Unmade Up: Recollections of a Friendship with David Bowie

£9.50

Unmade Up features much previously unseen artwork and photography of the enigmatic singer David Bowie, by his go-to artist of his heyday, Edward Bell. His commissions included the sleeve for Bowie’s 1980 album ‘Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)’ which featured the number one single ‘Ashes to Ashes’. Bowie later bought all of Bell’s artwork for his private collection. “David Bowie: He soared, his eagle eye spied everything. His magpie nature urged him to plunder with ruthless perception. The Chameleon absorbed, then radiated, colours eclipsing. A butterfly mind, alighting, random and eclectic. Courageous, enigmatic, outrageous, and contradictory, he was Star Man, Elephant Man, a Diamond Dog, Tin Machine, the mythological peacock of incorruptible flesh.

 

This account of my relationship with the man is written from the perspective of one who was of Bowie’s generation but preferred to listen to The Rolling Stones: who had been to art school, freelanced as a photographer and illustrator for magazines – Vogue, Tatler, The Sunday Times – a visual person, rather than musical. I greeted the shock of David’s death at first with a faint, sad shrug; the full impact was slow to dawn. If a drowning man is said to see his whole life experience on an instant in total recall, I was to experience a small death that lingered, and as it did so, forgotten incidents gradually returned with an extraordinary clarity. I felt compelled to write them all down, with the desire to share them.”

Visions of Motorhead

£12.00

This predominantly photographic book of largely unpublished, never before seen images brings together a mixture of concert photos and off stage shots from the late 70s through to the early 90s, covering the classic line-up with Phil Taylor and Eddie Clarke through to the four-man line-up with Phil Campbell, Wurzel and Pete Gill and the return of Phil Taylor. The never before seen images include shots from recording sessions and video shoots plus back stage at the tenth anniversary gig at Hammersmith, June 1985. There are even some hilarious photos of Lemmy during a beer tasting session and many more of the band’s legendary frontman as you have never seen him before!

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

£9.99

Linda Nochlin’s landmark essay heralded the dawn of a feminist history of art. It remains fundamental to any appreciation of art today. At once challenging and enlightening, it is never less than fully engaging, enticing the reader to question their own assumptions and to set off in new directions. Nochlin refuses to handle the question of why there have been no ‘great women artists’ on its own, corrupted, terms. Instead, she dismantles the very concept of greatness, unravelling the basic assumptions that created the male-centric genius in art. With unparalleled insight, Nochlin lays bare the acceptance of a white male viewpoint in art historical thought as not merely a moral failure, but an intellectual one.

 

In this stand-alone anniversary edition, Nochlin’s influential essay is published alongside its reappraisal, ‘Thirty Years After’. Written in an era of thriving feminist theory, as well as queer theory, race and postcolonial studies, ‘Thirty Years After’ is a striking reflection on the emergence of a whole new canon. With reference to Louise Bourgeois, Cindy Sherman and many more, Nochlin diagnoses the state of women and art with unmatched passion and precision. ‘Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?’ has become a rallying cry that resonates across culture and society. Nochlin’s message could not be more urgent: as she herself put it in 2015, ‘there is still a long way to go’.