Author

Various

Author's books

A Clutch of Curious Characters

£4.95

A historic edition:

 

Meet Monsieur Benoit, who appeared suddenly in Paris with a scheme for telegraphing messages across the world (or, at least, across the room) by means of electricity and the telepathic power of snails, and actually raised the money to build this extraordinary machine.

 

His powers of persuasion clearly exceeded those of Colonel Baker, who seemed the personification of Victorian solidity until that embarrassing incident in the sealed railway compartment, where he failed to entice Miss Dickinson to join in his bit of fun, and afterwards had to try and explain his conduct to the High Court, with the whole nation hanging on his every word.

 

Here is a fascinating collection of some of history’s most extraordinary characters. Richard Glyn Jones has cast his net wide to gather these accounts of human oddity and eccentricity, and the standard of his writing is high, with Lytton Strachey, Derek Hudson, Christopher Sykes and Ronald Knox among the authors included. Hilariously funny, sometimes rather sad, but invariably interesting, this is a superbly diverting book. And, with a couple of tiny exceptions, it’s all true.

Abolishing the Police

£8.00

Publication date: 7th June 2021

 

“This is the first time we are seeing… a conversation about defunding, and some people having a conversation about abolishing the police and prison state. This must be what it felt like when people were talking about abolishing slavery.” – Patrisse Cullors, Black Lives Matter.

 

Abolishing the Police (An Illustrated Introduction) is both a contribution to this conversation and an invitation to join it. It provides rigorous and accessible analyses of why we might want to abolish the police, what abolishing them would involve, and how it might be achieved, introducing readers to the rich existing traditions of anti-police theory and practice.

 

Its authors draw on their diverse on-the-ground experiences of political organising, protest, and resistance to policing in the UK, France, Germany, and the United States, as well as their original research in academic fields ranging from law to security studies, political theory to sociology to public health.

 

Without assuming any prior specialist knowledge, they present the critical tools and insights these disciplines have to offer to ongoing struggles against the injustices of policing (and consider, in turn, what these disciplines must learn from these struggles.)

Apocalypse: An Anthology

£19.99

This first anthology of ‘Apocalyptic’ or neo-romantic poetry since the nineteen-forties includes over 150 poets, many well known (Dylan Thomas, W.S. Graham), and others quite forgotten (Ernest Frost, Paul Potts). Over forty of the poets are women, of whom Edith Sitwell is among the most exuberant. Much of the contents has never previously been anthologised; many poems are reprinted for the first time since the 1940s. The poetry of the Second World War appears in a new context, as do early Tomlisnon and Hill. Here readers can enjoy an overview of the visionary-modernist British and Irish poetry of the mid-century, its antecedents and its aftermath. As a period style and as a body of work, Apocalyptic poetry will come as a revelation to most readers.

Being Alive

£12.00

‘Being Alive’ is the sequel to ‘Staying Alive’, which became Britain’s most popular poetry book because it gave readers hundreds of thoughtful and passionate poems about living in the modern world. Now he has assembled this equally lively companion anthology for all those readers who’ve wanted more poems that touch the heart, stir the mind and fire the spirit. ‘Being Alive’ is about being human: about love and loss, fear and longing, hurt and wonder. ‘Staying Alive’ didn’t just reach a broader readership, it introduced thousands of new readers to contemporary poetry, giving them an international gathering of poems of great personal force, poems with emotional power, intellectual edge and playful wit. It also brought many readers back to poetry, people who hadn’t read poetry for years because it hadn’t held their interest. ‘Being Alive’ gives readers an even wider selection of vivid, brilliantly diverse contemporary poetry from around the world. A third companion anthology, ‘Being Human’ (2011), completes this modern poetry trilogy.

Bruce Springsteen: Glory Days – 50 Years of Dreaming

£7.50

For over forty years, Bruce Springsteen has been on top of the rock n roll stage with 18 studio albums – from his debut Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J. to 2014 s High Hopes – his a life dedicated to music-making and committed songwriting. This book examines every part of his musical career, discussing influences and how his background shaped his songwriting. His albums have reflected deeply-felt passions and concerns, from the position of the American working man in The River and Nebraska, to deep personal relationships in Tunnel of Love; from the bleak vistas in Darkness on the Edge of Town to the anger of Born in the U.S.A.

Closure: Contemporary Black British Short Stories

£9.99

From well-known and award-winning authors-including Bernardine Evaristo, Fred D’Aguiar, and Leone Ross-to previous unpublished writers, this ambitious and intriguing anthology of short stories showcases each author’s most challenging work. These works from writers who are happy to describe themselves as Black British, have a rich variety of styles, forms, and themes, from raw realism, the erotic, and elegant economy, to the fanciful, humorous, and the tender.

 

The contributors to Closure display a keen awareness of the short story form in all its contemporary possibilities as a way of telling and finding a form for the writer’s vision. These are stories about the ways in which we do and do not love, unrequited yearnings, the quiet and often hidden violence in our lives, moments of epiphany, and the precious occasions of jubilation and uplift.

I Am Both Stranger and of This Place

£5.00

Poems from Indonesia and the UK by Rufus Mufasa, Irma Agryanti, Billy Letford, Mario F. Lawi, Roseanne Watt, Jamil Massa.

 

The Indonesia – UK Poetry Indigenous Language Exchange is a project conceived by the British Council, Makassar International Writers’ Festival, Contains Strong Language and Wrecking Ball Press to enable cultural and linguistic exchange between poets from East Indonesia and the UK.

 

This project also celebrates UNESCO’s Year of Indigenous Language. This project is part of the broader programme of events for the Indonesia Market Focus at London Book Fair and is supported by the Indonesia Ministry of Education and Culture, the Indonesia Agency for Creative Economy (Bekraf) and the Indonesia National Book Committee.

Jubilee Lines: 60 Poets for 60 Years

£6.50

To mark the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the throne, Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy brings together a dazzling array of contemporary poets (sixty in fact) to write about each of the sixty years of Her Majesty’s reign. An all star line up – which includes such celebrated writers as Simon Armitage, Gillian Clarke, Wendy Cope, Geoffrey Hill, Jackie Kay, Michael Longley, Andrew Motion, Don Paterson and Jo Shapcott, alongside some of the newest young talent around – address a moment or event from their chosen year, be it of personal or political significance or both. Through a series of specially commissioned poems, Jubilee Lines offers a unique portrayal of the country and times in which we have lived since 1953, culminating in an essential portrait of today: the way we speak, the way we chronicle, the way we love and fight, the way we honour and remember. Brilliantly introduced by Carol Ann Duffy, Jubilee Lines is an unforgettable commemoration: not only a monarch’s reign but of a way of life.

LISTEN

£7.99

An anthology of writing and art works that simply respond to the work “listen” – through poems, paintings, photos, stories, songs, gardens and much more – all about listening and the importance of silence.

 

The artwork and writing in this anthology explore different perspectives on what it means to listen: from listening to music and the environment with one ear to listening to people with the other.

Morocco

£9.00

These publications are compiled similarly to a traveler’s scrapbook and they are essential reminders to all who have been traveling or only encourage the desire to travel may it be either the historical, architectural and religious aspects, or travel to discover the world. The photographs and illustrations convey the reality of everyday life without any pretension but have been put together as a travelogue which each and everyone one of us could have compiled. Local authenticity, the visitor’s point of view, colors and more colors, curious tourists, experienced travelers. And above all passionately original photographers, creators of ambience, visual artists!

Nick Drake: Remembered for a While

£40.00

‘Probably the most ambitious, generous and thorough volume about a musician to see publication’ Mouth Magazine

 

The authorised companion to the music of Nick Drake, compiled, composed and edited by Cally Callomon and Gabrielle Drake, with contributions from Nick’s friends, critics, adherents, family and from Nick Drake himself.

 

Remembered For A While is not a biography. It is, rather, an attempt to cast a few shards of light on Nick Drake the poet, the musician, the singer, the friend, son and brother, who was also more than all of these. We hope it will accompany all those in search of an elusive artist, whose haunting presence defies analysis.

Ode to the Child

£6.00

This is a celebration of children, of childhood and, in many ways, of being a parent. It covers some of the best poetry ever written about the charms, beauty, and love of children. British poets such as William Blake, Christina Rossetti, Milton, and Wordsworth rub shoulders with the best American poets, such as Walt Whitman and Longfellow. The poems range from the pain of losing a child to the humour of childish talk through to the profound love that being a mother or father can bring. Beautifully illustrated throughout, this is a book that would be enjoyed by any poetry enthusiast but also by anyone touched by a child in their life.

Remembering Oluwale

£8.99

Winner, “Best Anthology” at the Saboteur Awards 2017.


The result of the Remember Oluwale Writing Prize, launched in late 2015, this is a collection of thoughtful and poignant responses to the story of David Oluwale, hounded to his death in the River Aire in 1969. The 1971 trial in Leeds, UK, of the two policemen accused of his manslaughter brought David’s plight briefly into the national spotlight; newspaper reports by Ron Phillips, a BBC radio play by Jeremy Sandford and poetry by Linton Kwesi Johnson followed. Then David was mostly forgotten, while the issues that he embodied – hostility to migration, racism, mental ill-health, homelessness, police malpractice and destitution – continued to scar British society, still making headlines fifty years on.

 

Remembering Oluwale includes extracts from recent books about David by Caryl Phillips and Kester Aspden, as well as poems responding to his story by Ian Duhig, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Sai Murray, Zodwa Nyoni, and many other contemporary writers. The resulting body of work serves as an introduction to some fascinating new voices in UK literature, and also as a clarion call for us to re-make our neighbourhoods as places of inclusion, acceptance and hospitality.

Side by Side

£7.50

In this innovative book of poetry from the editor of “Heart to Heart”, forty poems from around the world speak about specific works of art. Included on every spread is the poem in its original language, an English translation and the piece of art that the poem is about. Readers will look at art and poetry in a new way in this multi-cultural selection! It includes a biography (brief) of each author, translator and artist.

The Beef Club

£11.50

Bring the steakhouse to your very own kitchen with Beef Club. This is the book for those who love hearty meals full of flavour. Impress your guests with classic meatballs served with aubergine and tomato sauce; take your burgers to the next level with homemade relishes and delicious topping suggestions; and master the art of the perfect steak. Alongside traditional meat favourites are inspired seafood recipes and vegetable and side dishes such as pumpkin and mozzarella salad and steamed garlic spinach. The Brunch chapter will make sure your Saturday morning starts the right way. Indulge in honey and butter pancakes, pork sandwiches or Eggs Benedict. Not forgetting your sweet tooth, Beef Club offers delectable desserts such as profiteroles and strawberry tarts, and cocktails to die for. This is a cutting-edge compendium of recipes for those who love good food.

The Emma Press Anthology of Love

£10.00

In The Emma Press Anthology of Love, that familiar four-letter word takes on a world of meanings. Love is written across the sky for the whole world to see, and whispered to a partner at the bus stop in the rain. Love is transcendent and love is everyday, found equally in steamy texts and shopping lists, and the only reliable thing about it is that it’s never where you expected to find it.

 

Building on the success of 2015’s Mildly Erotic Verse, this book explores the diversity of modern romance. Often awkward, never perfect, romantic encounters and relationships are rooted in our own contemporary world of Tinder, Twitter and TV dinners. But they are also part of an enduring tradition: the cornerstone of our common humanity. In this book, thirty fresh, diverse and original voices speak to what love means right here, right now, bridging the gap between Hollywood imagery and modern lived experience, and forming an anthology open and welcoming to diverse understandings of romance, including a strong selection of work addressing LGBTQ+ experiences.

The Reater Issue 2

£8.00

The shadow of the moth flicks the page I’m reading. I look up to the white blindness of a tired yellow bulb hanging heavy with temporary heat. My eyes recoil, staining the page with silverfish jizz. After blinking a couple of times, I push the button, raise the nib and I’m back to this…

 

Contributors

 

Devereaux Baker, Andrew Parker, P.D. Oliver, Maurice Rutherford, Rosemary Palmeira, Joan Jobe Smith, T. Anders Carson, Matthew Firth, Jaqueline Karp-Gendre, Ian Parks, Brian Docherty, Fred Voss, Peter Knaggs, Dean Wilson, Jules Smith, Linda K, Seamus Curran, Peter Didsbury, Joanne Pearson, Charles Bukowski, Norman Jackson, Andy Fletcher, Geoff Stevens, Gerald Locklin, Labi Siffre, Carol Coiffait. Illustrations by Kevin Rudeforth

The Reater Issue 3

£7.95

Issue 3 contains poetry by Brendan Cleary, Geoff Hattersley, Roddy Lumsden, Labbi Siffre, Joan Jobe Smith, Fred Voss, Gerald Locklin, Greta Stoddart, Simon Armitage. Reviews of ‘On The Buses With Dostoyevsky’ by Geoff Hattersley, ‘Sacrilege’ by Brendan Cleary, ‘New Blood’ a Bloodaxe anthology, and ‘Carnegie Hall With Tin Walls’ by Fred Voss.

 

Issue 3 also includes the first ever published interview with Charles Bukowski entitled ‘Charles Bukowski Speaks Out‘ by Arnold L. Kaye. – This is the first time the interview has been reprinted since its original publication in ‘The Chicago Literary Times‘, March 1963.

 

Contributors

 

Brendan Cleary, Gerald Locklin, Khan Singh Kumar, Peter Knaggs, K.M. Dersley, Roddy Lumsden, Joan Jobe Smith, Labi Siffre, Lisa Glatt, Carol Coiffait, Tricia Cherin, Charles Bukowski, Sean Burn, Devreaux Baker, Jules Smith, Rodney Wood, Fred Voss, Richard Whelan, Greta Stoddart, Maurice Rutherford, James Prue, Ben Myers, Simon Armitage, David Hernandez, Charles Bennet, B.A.J. Evans, A.A. Dodd, Dave Wright, Gordon Mason, Ian Parks, Andrew Parker, Michael Curran, Dean Wilson, Daithidh MacEochaidh, Jon Summers, Janet Oliver, Fiona Curran, Denise Duhamel, David Lyall, Raymond Robinson, Mark Mckain, Geoff Hattersley. Drawings by David Hernandez

The Reater Issue 5

£7.95

The Reater seems to carry on a colloquial poetic conversation between the east coast of Britain and the west coast of America with readers and writers listening in from many points in the middle. Much of the work it publishes has the rare quality of language overheard, avoiding the preached at spoken to told off stuff that sometimes characterizes grander or more traditional work.” Simon Armitage

 

“The streetwise slab-sized Reater is streets ahead of any other magazine in giving the reader a working report on the buzzy special relationship between British and American poetry. The new writers it generously showcases in each chunky issue are often as startlingly original as the more familiar names. All are in touch with our times as well as with our selves.” Neil Astley

 

Contributors:

Rodney Wood, Peter Ardern, Brian Docherty, Sean Burn, Virgil Saurez, Felicity Tumpkin, Steve Timms, Steve Sneyd, Jacqueline Karp, James Prue, Andrew Parker, Mary Rudbeck Stanko, Ken Smith, Peter Carpenter, David Roberts, David Lyall, Jacqueline Sousa, Jo Pearson, Brendan Mcmahon, Dave Newman, Anna Woodford, Finella Davenport, B.Z. Niditch, Robert Nazarene, Rosemary Palmeira.

 

Paintings by Dee Rimbaud

The Writer’s War

£7.00

‘When I come home and leave behind Dark things I would not call to mind …’ wrote Leslie Coulson, one of the many soldiers who tried to express his wartime experiences in writing: dreaming of an idyllic England in the face of the horror of the Western Front. Coulson was one of the hundreds of thousands who did not come home – but because of his poetry we glimpse something of his thoughts and experiences.

 

Today we can be grateful that so many of those who endured the First World War did write about it: giving us an unmatched view of an event which would otherwise be completely beyond our ability to imagine. The Writers’ War is a collection of excerpts from outstanding accounts of the First World War. It provides an essential insight to anyone interested in modern history or early twentieth-century literature. Extraordinary extracts bring the human experience of war brilliantly to life – from the terror of bombardment, or the camaraderie of military service, to the home front.

 

The writing reflects an enormous range of nationalities and personalities. It includes memorable poetry, fiction, and journalism. Some great names of modern English literature appear, such as Arthur Conan Doyle, D. H. Lawrence and Rudyard Kipling. In addition, there are superb accounts by foreign authors such as novelists Edith Wharton and Henri Barbusse, and flying ace Manfred von Richthofen. The Writers’ War gives an unparalleled insight into a world-changing event, and what it meant in human terms both to the writers and millions of others caught up in it.

Toad Tales

£8.95

One day, as if by magic, there were toads everywhere in Hull. Then, just as quickly as they appeared, they disappeared. After what seemed like the longest hibernation they are back, living within these pages.

 

Toad Tales is an enthralling account of the Larkin Toads’ adventures while they were away.

 

Various authors. Illustrations by Alice Beasley.

Use Words First

£10.00

Humanity explored through poetry. Twelve poets put their words first.

 

BBC Radio 1Xtra and Asian Network teamed up with BBC Contains Strong Language for Words First, a scheme aimed at finding the best emerging spoken word talent in the UK.

 

USE WORDS FIRST is a collection of 12 poets from Words First brought together in a brilliant anthology edited by Jude Yawson, co-writer of Stormzy’s Rise Up: The Story So Far and contributor to the SAFE anthology edited by Derek Owusu.

 

Exploring themese of identity, connectivity and mobilisation, USE WORDS FIRST brings together eclectic styles and people all exploring humanity in their own unique ways. This is a snapshot of some of the struggles, inspirations and muses of young Britain today expressed through poetry that spans from the personal to the political and is always full of beauty and power.

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