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Ripples of Hope Festival Online Book Fair

 

The Ripples of Hope Festival celebrates the power of people to make human rights a reality for all.

Inspired by people – their stories, their strength and their creativity – Ripples of Hope is a new, unique 5-day festival for all of us to:

THINK ABOUT THE CHALLENGES WE FACE AS COMMUNITIES AND AS HUMANITY;

CELEBRATE THE POWER OF PEOPLE TO MAKE CHANGE; AND

EXPLORE HOW WE CAN – TOGETHER – TAKE ACTION TO MAKE HUMAN RIGHTS A REALITY IN OUR COMMUNITIES AND ACROSS THE WORLD.

Wrecking Ball Press and Wrecking Ball Music & Books is delighted to provide this online Book Fair throughout the duration of the Ripples of Hope Festival. We also have a physical book stall at HOME on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

In addition to making relevant books available to festival-goers and those enjoying the festival at home, we will host interviews with writers and poets involved at the festival, who include Simon Armitage, Imtiaz Dharker, Sjon, Mona Arshi, Raymond Antrobus, Shivanee Ramlochan, Tishani Doshi, Malika Booker, Young Identity Demanii, Young Identity PA Bitez, Glyn Maxwell, Togara Muzanenhamo, Victoria Redel, Vona Groarke, Caroline Bird, Karen McCarthy Woolf, Kwame Dawes, Jennifer Wong, Luke Wright, Sean Borodale, Kimberly Campanello, Hinemoana Baker, Keisha Thompson, Mike Garry, Maura Dooley, Joelle Taylor, Jay Bernard, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Zaffar Kunial and Isaiah Hull.

For more information about Ripples of Hope Festival, visit https://www.ripplesofhopefestival.org

 

 

Speak from Here to There

£9.99

During 2015 and 2016, two poets from opposite sides of the world, Kwame Dawes and John Kinsella, exchanged poems in two cycles, Echoes and Refrains and Illuminations, that were in constant dialogue even as they remained defined and shaped by the details of their own private and public lives.

 

Kwame Dawes’ base was the flat prairieland of Lincoln, Nebraska, a landscape in which he, a black man, originally from Ghana and Jamaica, felt at once alien and deeply committed to the challenges of finding “home”. John Kinsella’s base was in the violently beautiful landscape of Western Australia, his home ground, thick with memory and the challenge of ecological threat and political ineptitude.  In the first cycle, Echoes and Refrains, the poets sought and found a language for this conversation of various modes and moods.  They were linked by the political and social upheavals in their respective spheres – Dawes contemplating the waves of violence consuming the US and the world, and Kinsella confronting the injustice of the theft of indigenous land and the terrible treatment of refugees and immigrants.  These poems chart an unpredictable journey towards friendship. They reflect commonalities – love of family, cricket, art, politics, music, and travel – and in poem after poem one senses how each is hungry to hear from the other and to then treat the revelations that arrive as triggers for his own lyric introspection –  risky, complex, formally considered and beautiful. They stretch one another, and provoke to a poetic honesty that comes with authority and assurance. In the second cycle of poems, Illuminations, locations shift but the concerns remain and are considered in different lights. Speak from Here to There reminds us of how poetry can offer comfort and solace, and how it can ignite the peculiar creative frenzy that enriches us.

Pepper Seed

£8.99

Shortlisted for the Poetry Prize for First Collection from the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry

 

Malika Booker s Pepper Seed is map and compass to a world of distinct yet interconnected landscapes. At home in a number of locales (Brooklyn, Brixton, Trinidad, Guyana, and Grenada) Booker trains a brave eye on the unspeakable and the unspoken. By turns bearing witness, to the interior lives of the characters that people her poems, and laying herself bare, conjuring an immediate and complex vision of the miraculous ordinary. Pepper Seed is a wind at the reader s back. It tickles, whispers, prods and shouts as we are borne from one world to the next.

Everyone Knows I Am a Haunting

£8.99

In Shivanee Ramlochan’s first collection of poems, Trinidad and Caribbean poetry finds an exciting new voice, one that displays a sharp intelligence, and iconoclastic spirit and fertility of imagination. Ramlochan’s poems take the reader through a series of imaginative narratives that are at once emotionally familiar and compelling, even as the characters evoked and the happenings they describe are heavily symbolic.

The Hat-Stand Union

£9.95

Playful in earnest, Caroline Bird in her fourth book of poems turns familiar stories on their heads. Adrift in a surreal world of the everyday, Bird’s protagonists declaim Chekhov in supermarkets, purchase mail-order tears, sing love-songs to hat-stands. At the centre of the collection Bird evokes the sinister side of Camelot, haunted by the experiments of its crazed tyrant-king. Bird’s characters and voices are at once savvy and vulnerable; underlying the exuberance is empathy with those who have lost themselves somewhere along the way. The everyday world of The Hat-Stand Union is beautiful, ominous and full of surprise.

Trouble Came to the Turnip

£9.95

Following “Looking Through Letterboxes”, her first collection (2002), Caroline Bird was acclaimed as a vivid and precocious new talent. “Trouble Came to the Turnip” confirms her originality as she strikes out again in new directions, taking nothing for granted. Her poems are ferociously vital, fantastical, sometimes violent, almost always savagely humorous and self-mocking. Caroline Bird’s world is inhabited by failed and (less often) successful relationships, by the dizzying crisis of early adulthood, by leprechauns and spells and Miss Pringle’s seven lovely daughters waiting to spring out of a cardboard cake, and the turnip.

Looking Through Letterboxes

£9.95

Caroline Bird at first appears to be a traditional story-teller. But the stories she tells are suspended, charged with metaphor, and built upon foundations strangely familiar: fairy tale, fantasy and the sweet-bitter world of romance. The further one reads in her haunted tales, the more remarkable becomes the variety of forms, metres and rhythms she uses, and the clearer their appropriateness. Things are not ever as they seem, and the poems bring us closer to how the world ‘really’ is for this talented teenager. They work metaphorically through our expectations and prejudices, which she rearranges and reanimates (‘with a step/in your dance, a forecast for lightning’), or those that relate to the world of childhood (‘I came to see if you were okay’) where language itself has never quite got a grip. In the poems of Caroline Bird gender politics are starkly redefined, as are the languages with which generations communicate and fail to agree.

Gumiguru

£9.95

Gumiguru is the tenth month of the Shona calendar – a month of dryness and heat before the first rains fall and rejuvenate the land. Togara Muzanenhamo’s second collection is a cycle of poems distilling the experiences of a decade into one calendar year, framed through the natural and agricultural landscapes of Zimbabwe. The book stands as both an elegy for the poet’s father and a hymn to the veldt, the farms and villages, and the men and women whose lives are interwoven with the land and the changing seasons.

Spirit Brides

£7.95

Togara Muzanenhamo’s first collection of poems evokes a number of worlds, familiar and unfamiliar. He takes us from his vivid, vanished childhood in Zimbabwe to Europe, where he lived for some years, making as he goes the stories and connections that coax a meaning out of time and change. These are less poems of memory than of creation. There exists a fractured world, partly hidden from the poet, in which dream makes a different kind of order. This unpredictable, parallel world provides an undertone, a treacherous reflection. “Spirit Brides” combines the real and the surreal, stone and steel on the one hand, and air on the other. The plains of the veldt in Zimbabwe are as tangible as the bookstore in Antwerp or the bottle-shop in Paris. There is a language here that fills some of the troubling silences of our time, that engages death, violence and, most particularly, love.

The Perseverance

£9.99

The Perseverance is the multi-award-winning debut by British-Jamaican poet Raymond Antrobus. Ranging across history and continents, these poems operate in the spaces in between, their haunting lyrics creating new, hybrid territories. The Perseverance is a book of loss, contested language and praise, where elegies for the poet’s father sit alongside meditations on the d/Deaf experience.

To Sweeten Bitter

£8.00

To Sweeten the Bitter is a collection by British Jamaican poet, Raymond Antrobus. After the death of his father, Raymond returns to Jamaica but restless questions begin to unearth inside him (Who I am now is something I need to remember). Upon returning to the UK Raymond travelled to Bristol, Liverpool, Hastings, Hull and around London to meditate in the places where the pain and grief of history is bigger than his own.

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