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Novels

Travels With Chinaski

£9.95

Travels with Chinaski is the lonely lurch into lunacy, anarchy, the drunken fall into disassociation, the paralytic collapse into alienation – the utter, utter headlong, bar-storming leap into the liberation of madness. Chinaski: the freedom, the fuck death, to fuck your only friend’s girl, to fuck over rat-infested bed-sit-land, to fuck your kidneys, your liver, your numerous court appearances and then to fucking care about your beautiful beat-up neighbour as she cries in the night. Chinaski walks into your life, side-stepping last night’s cold sick on the floor, he kicks you out of bed, he’s back from the dead and he is going to make you dance, rage and drink with sheer life. Chinaski is there for you like a hangover that’s moved in to stay.

 

Madness Can Set You Free

 

“Daithidh MacEochaidh’s words are delightfully wordy, swimming in the deep end of the language baths… I’m rereading Kerouac for ‘The Big Read’, and it seems to me that MacEochaidh shares some of his linguistic exuberance. More power to him!” – Ian McMillan

 

“Prose as raw as a manhir, designed to skin your knuckles” – Dai Vaughan

Turning Blue

£7.99

Nothing stays hidden forever.

 

In the depths of winter in an isolated Yorkshire hamlet, a teenage girl, Melanie Muncy, is missing.

 

The elite detective unit Cold Storage dispatches its best man to investigate. DI Jim Brindle may be obsessive, taciturn and solitary, but nobody on the force is more relentless in pursuing justice. Local journalist Roddy Mace has sacrificed a high-flying career as a reporter in London to take up a role with the local newspaper. For him the Muncy case offers the chance of redemption.

 

Darker forces are at work than either man has realised. On a farm high above the hamlet, Steven Rutter, a destitute loner, harbours secrets that will shock even the hardened Brindle. Nobody knows the bleak moors and their hiding places better than him.

 

As Brindle and Mace begin to prise the secrets of the case from the tight-lipped locals, their investigation leads first to the pillars of the community and finally to a local celebrity who has his own hiding places, and his own dark tastes.

Two Old Men’s Tales

£4.00

First published in 1834, Two Old Men’s Tales is made up of two novels told by old men reflecting on events in their respective pasts. The Deformed tells of the “deformed” Earl of St. Germains, heir to the Marquis of Brandon. After his step-mother gives birth to a son, Lord Louis, who is as good-looking as his mother, the young Earl is neglected. He finds companionship in Lilia, a poor relative. The Admiral’s Daughter relates the story of Iñez, daughter of Admiral Thornhaugh, who is intended to marry Captain Harry Vivian, an honest and sensible naval officer. On one of his visits he brings with him his friend Laurence Hervey, a character quite different from Vivian. Vivian marries Iñez, while Hervey goes away to Paris for five years. When he visits his old friend and his wife, he is captivated by Mrs. Vivian, leading to an elopement and the consequences attendant upon such a drastic action, a time when honour was defended with pistols at dawn.

Under the Mound

£9.00

During the Yule season of 1153 Malcolm mac Alasdair is sent to serve the half-Scottish, half-Viking Earl of Orkney, who is on a quest to regain his earldom from a treacherous cousin. Malcolm is an artistic boy with no knack for warfare, he is certain that he will only hinder the young earl – and get himself killed in the bargain. His father’s reason for sending him out on this adventure does nothing to allay his fears: in a vision he has seen Malcolm go to Orkney with Earl Harald. But this vision is incomplete – he hasn’t seen Malcolm return…

Until the Darkness Comes

£5.00

PI John Craine has come to Hale Island to get away from it all – the memories and the guilt, and a past that just won’t let go.

 

 

But within hours he stumbles across the dead body of a young girl on the beach. When the police arrive the body has inexplicably disappeared. Or – in his already tormented state – did Craine imagine it in the first place?

 

 

Determined to get at the truth, Craine starts asking questions. But it seems no one on the island is talking. And all too soon he finds himself tangled up in a deadly network of fear and violence.

 

 

Someone has a dark secret to keep, and Craine is getting in the way…

Vagabond

£10.00

‘I am sitting on the twenty-fourth storey of a hotel in Singapore. I am having a very serious nervous breakdown…’

 

If you want to know why the hero of A.P. Wolf’s riotous novel is going quietly insane in a concrete tower block, you’ll have to read Vagabond. It’s a story of twenty four hour piss-ups, cock fights, mah-jong, and unsafe sex in the kampongs and back-alleys of old Singapore. It features a pair of dogs called Rape and Pillage, a cat called Shitbag, a very large and very dangerous monkey, a crazed older brother called Dave, a posse of under-age and over curious daughters of local army officers, various murderous Marines, and Richard Chan, the most awe inspiring man in all Singapore. And one hell of a lot of Tiger beer.

 

And it all ends… well, badly.

Valley of Decision

£6.90

A novel from the Booker-Prize winning author Stanley Middleton. Rejacked and reissued in Windmill.

 

Mary and David Blackwell are content in their marriage but when Mary, a talented opera singer, is offered the chance to sing in America, everything changes. David, a music teacher and amateur cellist, is left behind in England and, when he suddenly stops hearing from her, he must decide how to carry on and what to do.

 

‘It is a very, very long time since any book made me physically cry. But Stanley Middleton’s Valley of Decision did just that, twice… The story is simple… Anyone, well almost anyone, could write that story… But only Mr Middleton could turn it into something approaching a small masterpiece.’ Martyn Goff, Daily Telegraph

White Teeth

£4.00

At the centre of this novel are two unlikely friends, Archie Jones and Samad Iqbal. Hapless veterans of World War II, Archie and Samad and their families become agents of England’s irrevocable transformation. A second marriage to Clara Bowden, a beautiful, albeit tooth-challenged, Jamaican half his age, quite literally gives Archie a second lease on life, and produces Irie, a knowing child whose personality doesn’t quite match her name (Jamaican for “no problem”). Samad’s late-in-life arranged marriage (he had to wait for his bride to be born), produces twin sons whose separate paths confound Iqbal’s every effort to direct them to his Islamic faith.

Wounding

£8.99

Cora has everything a woman is supposed to want – a career, a caring husband, children, and a stylish home. Desperate for release and burdened with guilt she falls into a pattern of ever increasing violence and sexual degradation till a one night stand tips her over the edge and she finds herself in a Dominatrix’s dungeon. Wounding explores a woman’s search for redemption, identity and truth.

Your Inner Hedgehog

£14.99

In the latest entertaining and hilarious Professor Dr Dr Moritz-Maria Von Igelfeld novel, our hopelessly out-of-touch hero is forced to confront uppity librarians, the rector of the university and a possible hostile takeover, all while trying to remain studiously above it all.

 

Professor Dr Dr Moritz-Maria von Igelfeld and his colleagues at the University of Regensburg’s Institute of Romance Philology pride themselves on their unwavering commitment to intellectual excellence. They know it is their job to protect a certain civilized approach to the scholarly arts. So when a new deputy librarian, Dr. Hilda Schreiber-Ziegler, threatens to drag them all down a path of progressive inclusivity, they are determined to stop her in the name of scholarship – even if that requires von Igelfeld to make the noble sacrifice of running for director of the Institute. Alas, politics is never easy, and in order to put his best foot forward, von Igelfeld will be required to take up a visiting fellowship at Oxford and cultivate the attentions of a rather effusive young American scholar. Still, von Igelfeld has always heeded the clarion call of duty, especially when it comes with a larger office.

Yugoslavia, My Fatherland

£9.99

When Vladan Borojević googles the name of his father Nedelko, a former officer in the Yugoslav People’s Army supposedly killed in the civil war after the decay of Yugoslavia, he unexpectedly discovers a dark family secret. The story which then unfolds takes him back to the catastrophic events of 1991, when he first heard the military term ‘deployment’, and his idyllic childhood came to a sudden end. Seventeen years later, Vladan’s discovery that he is the son of a fugitive war criminal sends him off on a journey round the Balkans to find his elusive father. On the way, he begins to understand how the falling apart of his family is closely linked with the disintegration of the world they used to live in. The story of the Borojević family deals intimately with the tragic fates of the people who managed to avoid the bombs, but were unable to escape the war.

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