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Penned in the Margins

Frankie Vah

£9.99

We all want something to believe in. It s 1987 and Frankie Vah gorges on love, radical politics, and skuzzy indie stardom. But can he keep it all down?

 

Following the multi-award-winning What I Learned From Johnny Bevan, Luke Wright s second verse play deals with love, loss, and belief, against a backdrop of skuzzy indie venues and 80s politics. Expect frenetic guitars, visceral verse, and a Morrissey-sized measure of heartache.

Natural Phenomena

£9.99

A city lies in ruins. Spires topple, planes fall. Rubble is broken by wildflower.

 

Birdsong and chatter cut through. Discover the urban wild in Meryl Pugh’s debut collection. Join the poet as flaneuse wandering the city’s hidden spaces to encounter its flora and fauna; its many-voiced song. A book of witnessing and overhearing, Natural Phenomena asks where the beauty is in the city of plastic, wire and glass; holds a mirror up to the self and asks how we contend with loss and absence in a constantly bustling environment.

No Dogs, No Indians

£9.99

How far would you go to resist oppression? What would you choose to remember, and what to forget? Are some wounds never meant to heal?

 

Siddhartha Bose’s play takes us to 1930s India to tell the story of Pritilata Waddedar, a young, female revolutionary who leads an attack on a whites-only club. ‘No Dogs, No Indians’ was commissioned by five major performing arts venues to mark the 70th anniversary of Indian independence.

Swims

£9.99

Elizabeth-Jane Burnett’s Swims documents wild swimming in lakes, rivers and seas across the UK, starting and ending in Burnett’s home county, Devon. An evocative long poem split into chapters, Swims is interspersed with a sequence about the poet’s father. This mesmerising, lyrical debut cuts a path through Britain’s waterways, investigating the human impact on the natural world as well as nature’s unmistakable effect on us.

The Old Weird Albion

£9.99

A woman stands at the edge of a cliff, looking out to sea and the horizon. Dancers welcome the sun in a circle of stones. A dowsing road turns without warning. A church bell. Footsteps.

 

Old Weird Albion is America writer Justin Hopper’s dark love song to the English South; a poetic essay interrogating the high, haunted landscape of the South Downs Way; the memories, myths and forgotten histories from Winchester to Beachy Head.

 

When someone disappears, when someone leaps from a cliff and is all-but-erased from memory, what traces might we find in the crumbling chalk of the cliff face; in the wind that buffets the edge of this Albion?

 

A skewed alternative to Bill Bryson, Hopper casts himself as the outsider as he wanders the English countryside in pursuit of mystical encounters. His journey sees him joining New Age eccentrics and accidental visionaries on the hunt for crop circles and druidic stones, discussing the power of nature with ecotherapists and pagans, tracing the ruins of abandoned settlements and walking the streets of eerie suburbs.

Twenty Theatres to See Before You Die

£14.99

From the tip of Cornwall to the Isle of Mull, through rural communities and the inner-city, Amber Massie-Blomfield takes the road less travelled to discover Britain’s most astonishing and unexpected theatres. A ruined playhouse, haunted halls, a stage hewn from granite cliffs. Theatres on wheels, squeezed into a former public lavatory and rescued from fire. A theatre that is not there at all.

 

Making the case for radical, quirky and non-conforming performance spaces alongside iconic venues, this book is a celebration of thriving against the odds. It also tells a personal account of a life-long love affair with the places where ‘anything is possible’: from open-air fry-ups and an impromptu can-can to paranormal manifestations. An adventure through theatre, place and the people who make it happen, Twenty Theatres to See Before You Die gives us reason to be hopeful.