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BTS: Icons Of K-Pop – The Unofficial Biography

£3.50

BTS is the breakthrough K-pop band. For the first time, this unofficial biography tells the story of the Korean boy band with a global army of fans, who have propelled their heroes to the top of the charts all over the world.

 

Seven good-looking boys – RM, Jin, Suga, J-Hope, Jimin, V and Jungkook – who can dance as well as they can rap and sing, are tearing up the global music charts. Nothing new? Think again. BTS, who rose to fame in their native South Korea in 2013 and who sing almost entirely in Korean, are now a sensation in the US, the UK and the rest of the world.

 

K-pop is a growing phenomenon in the West, and over the last few years, it has steadily gathered a huge global following. With their talent, dedication, good looks, fabulous choreography, and catchy blend of pop, hip hop and RnB, BTS are leading the advance.

 

Extensively researched, and written in an upbeat and accessible style, this book interweaves the success stories of each of the boys with how the band got together, while documenting their amazing rise to fame in Southeast Asia, and then the world. It includes 16 pages of full colour photographs of the band playing live, posing and having fun.

Bubblegum: The History of Plastic Pop

£4.99

Has the global phenomenon that is Pop Idol completely ruined pop music, or is it just the natural revolution of a genre of music that has always been manufactured? From Tin Pan Alley via The Monkees and finally to boy bands, this is the complete history of the most successful genre of music ever. Manufactured acts have been the money-spinning mainstay of the pop industry for decades. Bubblegum: The History of Plastic Pop takes a decade-by-decade look at some of the music industry’s more cynical creations from the 1950s to the 21st century, encompassing acts such as The Monkees, The Bay City Rollers and The Spice Girls, as well as the phenomenon that is Pop Idol and its siblings.

 

This revealing study includes interviews with the movers and shakers of the pop world and the artistic armies behind their successes, including Chinn and Chapman, Stock, Aitken and Waterman, Simon Fuller, Paula Abdul and Cathy Dennis. The result is a comprehensive look back at some of the fly-by-nights of pop and a DIY guide to becoming a pop star, listing the dos and don’ts of making it in the pop music industry.

Bushcraft Survival

£6.99

In BUSHCRAFT SURVIVAL Ray Mears travels to some of the most remote and beautiful wildernesses in the world, and experiences first hand the survival techniques of different indigenous cultures.

 

From the Hudson Bay in Canada, via Tanzania and the jungles of Venezuela, to the moors and highlands of Britain, BUSHCRAFT SURVIVAL explores a range of locations and techniques from indigenous peoples. Drawing on centuries of knowledge as well as his own experience, Ray demonstrates how our enjoyment of the wilderness comes through respect for our surroundings and the people, plants and animals that live there.

Caravans and Wedding Bands

£4.99

For Romany Eva Petulengro, marrying outside her culture was a big step to take. And now she had to adapt to living with a gorger – and her husband had to adapt to living with her! In this charming sequel to The Girl in the Painted Caravan, she describes their first eventful years of married life in Brighton, and the birth of their four children She also reveals how she became famous as a clairvoyant, the advice her clients needed, and the attack from an enraged wife who assumed her husband’s meetings with Eva meant he was having an affair.

 

In the Swinging Sixties, a sheltered Romany girl could easily find herself out of her depth, and Eva’s innocence led her into some strange situations, including a narrow escape from a notorious duchess. She also weaves in the story of her wider family, from her brother Nathan’s romance and the adventures of her charming brother Eddie to her aunts and cousins in Blackpool. Funny and heartwarming, Caravans and Wedding Bands is a poignant reminder of a time when life was changing irrevocably for the Romany, and yet their spirit remained the same.

Chicken & Other Birds

£10.00

Chicken and other types of poultry are versatile, readily available, reasonably priced, and packed full of protein, essential nutrients and vitamins. They are also the number one choice for anyone who is watching their fat and calorie intake but doesn’ t want to give up meat. This book brings together over 100 main course dishes that employ the whole range of cooking techniques, and that use the ubiquitous chicken as well as all the less well known birds such as turkey, goose, duck, guinea fowl, poussin, pigeon and quail. In addition, Chicken and Other Birds offers a visual tour of the birds, showing their relative sizes and discussing the differences between them.

Churchhill: The Statesman as Artist

£19.99

Across almost 50 years, Winston Churchill produced more than 500 paintings. His subjects included his family homes at Blenheim and Chartwell, evocative coastal scenes on the French Riviera, and many sun-drenched depictions of Marrakesh in Morocco, as well as still life pictures and an extraordinarily revealing self-portrait, painted during a particularly troubled time in his life. In war and peace, Churchill came to enjoy painting as his primary means of relaxation from the strain of public affairs.

 

In his introduction to Churchill: The Statesman as Artist, David Cannadine provides the most important account yet of Churchill’s life in art, which was not just a private hobby, but also, from 1945 onwards, an essential element of his public fame. The first part of this book brings together for the first time all of Churchill’s writings and speeches on art, not only ‘Painting as a Pastime’, but his addresses to the Royal Academy, his reviews of two of the Academy’s summer exhibitions, and an important speech he delivered about art and freedom in 1937.

 

The second part of the book provides previously uncollected critical accounts of his work by some of Churchill’s contemporaries: Augustus John’s hitherto unpublished introduction to the Royal Academy exhibition of Churchill’s paintings in 1959, and essays and reviews by Churchill’s acquaintances Sir John Rothenstein, Professor Thomas Bodkin and the art critic Eric Newton. The book is lavishly illustrated with reproductions of many of Churchill’s paintings, some of them appearing for the first time. Here is Churchill the artist more fully revealed than ever before.

Clubland Confidential

£5.50

‘Owen writes fast and tough, like a cop flick voice-over – if anything, Clubland Confidential is Robin Moore’s The French Connection remixed for the “chemical generation” ‘ -The Guardian

 

Clubland Confidential is the true story of the rise and fall of a decadent nocturnal empire that stretched over several American cities and spawned its own subculture of celebrities and wannabes. Journalist, Frank Owen spent nearly a decade inside the nightclubs of the 1990s – an era when disco gave way to more unsettling dance music, cocaine was supplanted by Ecstacy and heroin, ‘clubkids’ mingled with bully boys, trans people danced with stockbrokers, and celebrities looked on. But as the drugs got out of control, their world became murkier and slowly began to implode. As clubland decadence turned to darkness, its self-publicised king, Michael Alig, committed one of the most notorious crimes of New York’s recent history – the violent murder of Angel Melendez. With his friends fleeing for cover, a tangled web of mafia-related crimes begins to emerge and the secrets of New York nightlife are dragged through the courts.

Collected Film Poetry

£9.50

Containing: Arctic Paradise (previously unpublished), Loving Memory (The Muffled Bells, Mimmo Perrella Non è Piu, Cheating the Void, Letters in the Rock), The Blasphemers’ Banquet, The Gaze of the Gorgon, Black Daisies for the Bride, A Maybe Day in Kazakhstan, The Shadow of Hiroshima, Prometheus, Metamorpheus (previously unpublished), Crossings (previously unpublished),

 

With introductions by Tony Harrison and Peter Symes

Complex 90

£5.90

Hammer accompanies a politician to Moscow, where he is arrested by the KGB and imprisoned. He quickly escapes, but back in the States, the government is none too happy. Russia demands his return to stand charges, and various government agencies are following him. A question dogs Hammer: Why does Russia want him back, and why was sent to Russia with the senator in the first place?

Contemporary Irish Plays

£10.00

Contemporary Irish Plays showcases the new drama that has emerged since 2008. Featuring a blend of established and emerging writers, the anthology shows how Irish writers are embracing new methods of theatre-making to explore exciting new themes – while also finding new ways to come to terms with the legacies of the Troubles and the Celtic Tiger.

 

Drum Belly is a fascinating play about the Irish mafia in late 1960s’ New York. It premiered at the Abbey Theatre in 2012.

 

Previously unpublished, Planet Belfast by Rosemary Jenkinson is about a woman named Alice – Stormont’s only Green MLA who must toe a delicate line between large, sectarian power bases in order to promote an environmental agenda in Northern Ireland.

 

Forgotten features the interconnecting stories of four elderly people living in retirement homes and care facilities around Ireland, who range in age from 80 to 100 years old.

 

Desolate Heaven is a story about two young girls hoping to find freedom from home in the trappings of love. It was first performed at Theatre 503, London, in 2013.

 

Written for the 2012 Dublin Theatre Festival, and previously unpublished, The Boys of Foley Street by Louise Lowe is a piece of site-specific theatre which led audience members on a tour of the backstreets of inner-city Dublin.

 

Freefall is a sharp, humorous and exhilarating look at the fragility of a human life, blending impressionistic beauty, poignancy and comedy.

 

Edited by the leading scholar on Irish theatre, Patrick Lonergan, Contemporary Irish Plays is a timely reminder of the long-held tradition and strength of Irish theatre which blossoms even in its new-found circumstances.

Corfu Banquet

£6.50

Celebrating the tastes, smells and colours of an island where the cooking is seasonal and the flowers play changes on the theme of year-round spring, this memoir is written in the rhythm of the five seasons of Corfu. It tells the stories of the house of Rovinia, built in the 1960s by Emma Tennant’s parents, of Maria, the spirit of the house and her knowledge and wisdom, and entwines recipes and original photographs with fond recollections in prose.

Cover Versions: Singing Other People’s Songs

£4.00

Back in pop’s early days, every record was a cover version. Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald were famous for interpreting other people’s songs, and the closest Elvis Presley ever got to writing one was when his manager, Colonel Parker, arm-twisted the rights away from the original songwriters. The balance of power shifted when The Beatles and the Stones wrote all their own material, yet the great tradition of the cover version never died. In this elegantly-tooled volume, Adam Sweeting gets the lowdown on cover versions – the worst, the most popular, the most frequently recorded, the most successful, the stupidest, the most tasteless, the most influential, and the ones nobody got around to yet.

David Lean: An Intimate Portrait

£8.00

David Lean’s films were nominated for an astonishing 57 Academy Awards, of which 27 won Oscars. He made unique movies on a grand scale, with huge stories on vast canvases. He was aided by hundreds of technicians, thousands of extras and the most talented actors in the world. Yet he singularly controlled this vast army giving pleasure and inspiration to millions.

 

His films reflected his own life – the single brooding perfectionist force to a great endeavour – whether they be Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago or Brief Encounter. Collated by his widow, Lady Sandra Lean, this is a highly personal account in text and images by the people that came into contact with David through his work and his private life.

 

Thousands of words have been written about David Lean the film director and the work he created. Yet until now, very little has been said about the man who sacrificed his private life for his art. Six marriages are proof of a man whose preferred family was the film crew and whose personal life was always subservient to making films. Yet, without a strong understanding of human emotion, how could a man make so many productions that touched the hearts of millions?

 

In this fascinating book, the answers are presented in both text and pictures. David always said that a good book should contain “Really good pictures…That’s all. Just bloody good pictures.” Illustrated throughout with over 300 well-known and previously unpublished photographs, which are complemented by David’s inspiration: letters, quotations, memorabilia or an anecdote relating to his travels or his films David Lean – An Intimate Portrait is a unique study, containing a wealth of fascinating photography, of a man who continues to entertain millions.

Deep Lane

£5.00

Deep Lane is a book of descents: into the earth beneath the garden, into the dark substrata of a life. But these poems seek repair, finally, through the possibilities that sustain the speaker above ground: gardens and animals; the pleasure of seeing; the world tuned by the word. Time and again, an image of immolation and sacrifice is undercut by the fierce fortitude of nature: nature that is not just a solace but a potent antidote and cure. Ranging from agony to rapture, from great depths to hard-won heights, these are poems of grace and nobility.

Deep Water

£4.50

Autumn has come to StregaSchloss, and as the days grow dark, an even darker depression has come over the Strega-Borgia family. Ever since the disappearance of their beloved nanny, Mrs. McLachlan, nothing has been the same. To make matters worse, Luciano has been wrongfully charged with her murder and thrown into prison. Never has the family needed Mrs. McLachlan so badly! But with the help of a magical camera and a mysterious silver thread, there may still be hope…

Dexys Midnight Runners

£8.50

This is the first book written by a member of Dexys Midnight Runners from the period of their debut album Searching For the Young Soul Rebels. This book is the story of the making of that album and what it was like being a member of the band and working with the genius Kevin Rowland. Alongside Geoff Blythes and the authors narrative the book includes contributions from a selection of fans and people that were connected with the making of the album and the band at the time. The Team That Dreams in Caffs also includes photographs from Mike Layes collection. Mike was the bands official photographer between 1979 and 1980 and captured that iconic image that the band displayed of donkey jackets, wooly hats, brogues and carrying northern soul style holdalls. All the photographs are black and white, which adds to the atmosphere of the book. Searching For The Young Soul Rebels was the album that gave the world such songs as Geno and There There My Dear and put Dexys Midnight Runners on the map. The album is regarded as many as one of the greatest debut albums of all time and this book is an attempt to celebrate that fact. It’s a book that will resonate with a generation and appeal to those still searching for the young soul rebel in themselves.

Dreams to Remember

£6.90

When he died suddenly at the age of twenty-six, Otis Redding (1941 1967) had already become the conscience of a new kind of soul music. Sure, Berry Gordy might have built the first black-owned music empire at Motown, but Redding was doing something as historic: mainstreaming black music within the whitest bastions of the post-Confederate south. As a result, the Redding story still largely untold is one of great conquest but, sadly, grand tragedy. Now, in this transformative work, Mark Ribowsky contextualises Redding’s life within the larger cultural movements of his era, whisking us from the sinful clubs of Macon to the trendsetting studios in Memphis and, finally, to the pulsating stage of the Monterey Music Festival where, in a single set, Redding immortalized himself as a soul legend.

 

What emerges in Dreams to Remember is not only a triumph of music history but also a reclamation of a visionary who would come to define an entire era.”

Drysalter

£6.00

Winner of the 2013 Forward Poetry Prize for Best Collection
Winner of the 2013 Costa Poetry Award
Shortlisted for the 2013 T. S. Eliot Poetry Prize

Shortlisted for the 2015 Portico Prize

 

Michael Symmons Roberts’ sixth – and most ambitious collection to date – takes its name from the ancient trade in powders, chemicals, salts and dyes, paints and cures. These poems offer a similarly potent and sensory multiplicity, unified through the formal constraint of 150 poems of 15 lines.

 

Like the medieval psalters echoed in its title, this collection contains both the sacred and profane. Here are hymns of praise and lamentation, songs of wonder and despair, journeying effortlessly through physical and metaphysical landscapes, from financial markets and urban sprawl to deserts and dark nights of the soul.

 

From an encomium to a karaoke booth to a conjuration of an inverse Antarctica, this collection is a compelling, powerful search for meaning, truth and falsehood. But, as ever in Roberts’ work – notably the Whitbread Award-winning Corpus – this search is rooted in the tangible world, leavened by wit, contradiction, tenderness and sensuality.

 

This is Roberts’ most expansive writing yet: mystical, philosophical, earthy and elegiac. Drysalter sings of the world’s unceasing ability to surprise, and the shock and dislocation of catching your own life unawares.

Dylan Goes Electric!

£10.00

One of the music world’s pre-eminent critics takes a fresh and much-needed look at the day Dylan “went electric” at the Newport Folk Festival, timed to coincide with the event’s fiftieth anniversary.

 

On the evening of July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan took the stage at Newport Folk Festival, backed by an electric band, and roared into his new rock hit, Like a Rolling Stone. The audience of committed folk purists and political activists who had hailed him as their acoustic prophet reacted with a mix of shock, booing, and scattered cheers. It was the shot heard round the world—Dylan’s declaration of musical independence, the end of the folk revival, and the birth of rock as the voice of a generation—and one of the defining moments in twentieth-century music.

 

In Dylan Goes Electric!, Elijah Wald explores the cultural, political and historical context of this seminal event that embodies the transformative decade that was the sixties. Wald delves deep into the folk revival, the rise of rock, and the tensions between traditional and groundbreaking music to provide new insights into Dylan’s artistic evolution, his special affinity to blues, his complex relationship to the folk establishment and his sometime mentor Pete Seeger, and the ways he reshaped popular music forever. Breaking new ground on a story we think we know, Dylan Goes Electric! is a thoughtful, sharp appraisal of the controversial event at Newport and a nuanced, provocative, analysis of why it matters.

Edward Bond: Plays 9

£5.00

Edward Bond Plays:9 brings together recent work by the writer of the classic stage plays Saved, Lear, The Pope’s Wedding, and Early Morning. The volume comprises five new plays and a comprehensive introduction by the author exploring theories of writing and theatre.

 

Innocence is the final play in The Paris Pentad, a dramatic epic stretching from the 1940s to the end of the twenty-first century. The conflicts at the heart of civilisation have erupted into violence, and the characters in Innocence must seek refuge in each other to escape the cruelty of war.

 

Window, Tune, Balancing Act and The Edge are plays commissioned by The Big Brum Theatre. With themes of drug use, violence, suicide, and mother-son relations, the plays focus on problems directly aimed at modern youth culture. Ideally suited to students, performers and particularly university showcases, they are short, interesting and powerful pieces.

 

This edition also includes some of Bond’s previously unpublished Theatre Poems.

England: Poems from a School

£6.00

‘Not just good for school children, but great by any standard’ – Phillip Pullman

 

Oxford Spires Academy is a small comprehensive school with 30 languages – and one special focus: poetry. In the last five years, its students have won every prize going. They have been celebrated in the Guardian (‘The Very Quiet Foreign Girls Poetry Group’), and the subject of a BBC Radio 3 documentary.

 

In this unique anthology, their mentor and teacher prize-winning poet Kate Clanchy brings their poems together, and allowing readers to see why their work has caused such a stir. By turns raw and direct, funny and powerful, lyrical and heartbreaking, they document the pain of migration and the exhilaration of building a new land, an England of a thousand voices. In England: Poems from a School, you will find poetry is easy to read and hard to forget, as fresh, bright and present as the young migrants who produced it.

Favourite Poems

£1.90

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–1882) was the most popular American poet of his time, and one of the most famous American poets of all time. It has been said that certain of his poems — the long narratives Evangeline and The Song of Hiawatha most notably — were once read in every literate home in America. A former teacher who fulfilled his dream to make a living as a poet, Longfellow taught at Bowdoin and Harvard, was eventually honored for his poetry with degrees from Oxford and Cambridge, and is one of the few Americans to have a monument dedicated to his memory in Westminster Abbey. This choice collection of his works, which reflects his mastery of a rich variety of poetic forms and meters, includes one of his best narrative poems, The Courtship of Miles Standish. Here, too, are such famous poems as “The Village Blacksmith,” “The Wreck of the Hesperus,” “The Children’s Hour,” “Paul Revere’s Ride,” and other poems on subjects ranging from lost youth and Giotto’s Tower to slavery and the building of a ship. Includes a selection from the Common Core State Standards Initiative: “Paul Revere’s Ride.”

Feverfew

£2.50

This is a guide to what is known as feverfew, a herbal plant used in the mainstream treatment of migraine, and increasingly found to relieve arthritis and other complaints. The book aims to give a balanced account of the research into feverfew, and its gradual acceptance into orthodox medicine. The “Sheldon Natural Remedies” series offers information about complementary remedies. It aims to set out the safe way to use them, including quick reference for symptoms which require medical attention, what to expect from a treament, who should not use the remedies, motivation and maintaining effective change.

From a Persian Kitchen

£10.00

The food of Iran is a riot of tastes and aroma, and is one of the great – but least known – cuisines of the world. With an emphasis on the use of seasonal ingredients, fresh herbs and fragrant spices, Jila Dana-Haeri here presents a unique guide to quintessential Persian cooking. The varieties of beautiful jewelled rice dishes, hearty winter dishes and crisp summer salads, showcase the diversity of Iranian regional cooking, from the sweet and sour flavours of the Northern Caspian Coast to the spicy and aromatic tastes of the South and the Persian Gulf. The complimentary mix of flavours – the fresh tartness of pomegranate seeds and the subtle perfume of saffron, tarragon, dill and fenugreek – create an array of mouth-watering recipes that are now, thanks to Dana-Haeri’s contribution, accessible to cooks of all levels. This lavishly-illustrated cookbook offers an enticing selection of recipes for any occasion. It will be essential for all interested in expanding their cultural and culinary horizons.

From the Virgil Caverns

£4.90

This collection marks a fascinating point in the poetic career of the late Peter Redgrove, when – at the age of seventy – he decided to strike out in a thrilling new direction.

 

Using a liberating stepped verse form, he opens up new paths in fresh territory, while consolidating his position as one of the finest poets of the natural world. The questing eye of his imagination is in constant motion: the book is full of doors and stairs and wheels, the movement of light and water, the world’s daily transformations. Even his characters are shape-changers – the doctors, dentists, chemists and undertakers are all, in their way, magicians. And, evident throughout the collection, is an undertow of mortality – notably in the extraordinarily moving poems about Redgrove’s late father: ‘his knowledge went, and mine followed,/ Catch it before/ It leaves like a ghost,/ on these stepped verses’.

Game Cookery

£9.90

The new edition of this popular cookbook includes 25 new game recipes, so indulge your taste buds with new sensations! Featuring over 120 delicious recipes for cooking grouse, partridge, pheasant, duck, rabbit, venison, and other game, these easy-to-follow recipes include dishes appropriate for everyday family meals, special occasions, picnics, and barbecues. There is a comprehensive guide for preparing game so that it is fit to be eaten, including hanging, plucking and jointing, and there are an assortment of recipe accompaniments such as sauces, stuffings, and salads.

 

With 18 full-colour illustrations by the well-known wildlife artist John Paley this is an attractive and useful gift for all those keen on hunting, shooting and fishing, and for those who cook what they bring home. Game is naturally low in fat and calories and is an ideal part of a healthy diet so even if you’ve never cooked game before it is the perfect addition to a meal if you want to try something new.

Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy

£6.50£9.99

Mike Love is a founding member, lyricist and vocalist of The Beach Boys, considered to be the most popular American band in history, with 13 Gold Albums, 55 top-100 singles, and four #1 hits. Love has been the lead singer of the group one of its principal lyricists since its inception in 1961.

 

In Good Vibrations, Mike Love tells the unique story of his legendary, chaotic, and ultimately triumphant five-decade tenure as the front man of The Beach Boys, from their Californian roots to international fame.

 

Mike Love’s credits include such pop classics as “Good Vibrations,” “California Girls,” “I Get Around,” “Fun Fun Fun,” and “Kokomo.”

Grimalkin & Other Poems

£7.50

The poems in Grimalkin – Thomas Lynch’s first publication in Britain are all concerned, in one way or another, with achieving a balance in the face of gravity. In each poem, Lynch is looking for this equilibrium between equal and opposing forces: the gravities of sex and death, love and grief – all the things that make us breathless and horizontal, mortal and memorable.

By means of a wry, mordant wit, telling observation and glorious poise, we are shown the strong tensions that make us human: the forces in our nature that create, replicate, restore, renew us; and those that kill us, constrict our lives, silence us. From spirited invective to meditations on morality, from lyrics of love and desire to a corrosive flyting to his ex-wife, these poems explore an extraordinary emotional range and technical facility but, more importantly, they reveal a compassionate, wise, and genial humanity.

Happy Mondays

£7.00

Their story is a vindication for every northern hooligan rock band out there. Happy Mondays sparked a British guitar pop renaissance.’   Alan McGee

 

In 1985, when the Happy Mondays exploded onto the Manchester music scene like a Molotov cocktail, no one had heard anything like them before. As they developed into the face of the Acid House ‘Madchester’ movement, critics ranked them alongside The Velvet Underground and the Sex Pistols as cultural lightning rods, and that was just for the music.

 

The stories of their excesses are the stuff of rock ’n’ roll legend: the overdoses, fights on stage, the death threats, the gangsters, the stabbings and shootings in the studio. Yet this seemingly unhinged and uncontrollable band – encouraged by their equally crazed benefactors at Factory Records – transformed British music forever, leaving behind five infectious albums of unparalleled dirt and delight.

 

Twenty-five years after their breakthrough appearance on Top of the Pops, in November 1989, Simon Spence, the acclaimed biographer of The Stone Roses: War and Peace, tells the story of how the Happy Mondays came to provide the soundtrack to Britain’s last great youth movement. Based on extensive interviews with the band and key associates, he reveals the truth behind the mythic stories that have ensured their outlaw reputation, and unravels the chaos that led to the group’s ultimate implosion and the tragic collapse of Factory Records.

 

A riotous mix of pills, thrills and joyous chart hits, this is the untold story of Britain’s greatest rock ’n’ roll gang.

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